Cartoons are for sharing

I believe in sharing.

Feel free to download the cartoons on this blog for your personal use.

You can print them out and put them to your wall, post them in your blog, add them to a PowerPoint presentation, print them out on to posters, T-shirts, coffee mugs, a mouse pad, homemade greeting cards, or whatever, as long as it’s for your own personal use.

As long as you’re not trying to make money off it and you’re giving me attribution, go for it.

My licensing terms are pretty open.

If you see a cartoon you like, here’s what you can do:

  1. Download the high-resolution image to your hard drive.
    (To download an image: right-click on the image and select “Save Link As”)
  2. Upload the image to Cafepress.com
  3. Create your own cool personal item, such as a T-Shirt or coffee mug.

Soon you’ll have a crowd of people asking you about your new shirt (or mug).

It’s quick. It’s easy.

Enjoy.

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Why are there cartoons on this blog?

The cartoons (a.k.a. artwork) on this blog are social objects.

A social object is a conversation starter, an idea starter, a thought virus.

A social object is the reason a group comes together in the first place. It helps define what the group has in common.

A social object starts a conversation. That conversation is more important than the social object that started the conversation.

The cartoons on this blog are intended to spark conversations on a wide variety of topics related to clean energy.

The cartoons on this blog are available for free – for your personal use.

Feel free to print them out and post them at work and at home.

If you want a privately-commissioned social object or to license the commercial use of an existing cartoon, contact me at

contact [at] CleanEnergySecrets [dot] com


My use of social objects has been inspired by:

  • Hugh MacLeod (www.gapingvoid.com)
  • Seth Godin (author of Purple Cow)
  • Jyri Engestrom (anthropologist and Jaiku founder)
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A house with geothermal heating and cooling

After a dozen years in the construction business, Bob Burnside wanted to build a house that would symbolize his commitment to energy efficiency. “I wanted it to be on the leading edge of what we do…(read more)

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Posted in Energy Efficiency, Green Building | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Japan's Lessons on the Economy and the Environment: Our Pollution Experience

In less than 60 years Japan was able to convert its war-torn economy into a world class economy. But this rapid economic growth came at a price. The price was pollution which impacted the environment and public health. Some of the pollution-related diseases include:

  • Minamata disease
  • Yokkaichi asthma
  • Itai Itai

This program looks at how Japan has suffered from the impact of pollution.

Part 1

Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

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Thomas Berry Speaks

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Appraisers Are Ignoring Energy Efficiency

If Realtors are banking on green house features, why aren’t lenders doing the same? Read about banks’ roadblocks to building better homes.

Read more

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Japan as ground zero for no-waste lifestyle

Also watch Creating a Zero-Waste City.

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The Dream of the Earth by Thomas Berry

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How Much Global Warming Is Guaranteed Even If We Stopped Building Coal-Fired Power Plants Today?

Humanity has yet to reach the point of no return when it comes to catastrophic climate change, according to new calculations. If we content ourselves with the existing fossil-fuel infrastructure we can hold greenhouse gas concentrations below 450 parts per million in the atmosphere and limit warming to below 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels—both common benchmarks for international efforts to avoid the worst impacts of ongoing climate change—according to a new analysis in the September 10 issue of Science. The bad news is we are adding more fossil-fuel infrastructure—oil-burning cars, coal-fired power plants, industrial factories consuming natural gas—every day.

A team of scientists analyzed the existing fossil-fuel infrastructure to determine how much greenhouse gas emissions we have committed to if all of that kit is utilized for its entire expected lifetime. The answer: an average of 496 billion metric tons more of carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere between now and 2060 in “committed emissions”.

That assumes life spans of roughly 40 years for a coal-fired power plant and 17 years for a typical car—potentially major under- and overestimates, respectively, given that some coal-fired power plants still in use in the U.S. first fired up in the 1950s. Plugging that roughly 500 gigatonne number into a computer-generated climate model predicted CO2 levels would then peak at less than 430 ppm with an attendant warming of 1.3 degrees C above preindustrial average temperature. That’s just 50 ppm higher than present levels and 150 ppm higher than preindustrial atmospheric concentrations.

Still, we are rapidly approaching a point of no return, cautions climate modeler Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution for Science’s Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University, who participated in the study.

(more)

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180 Degrees South

Chris Malloy’s film strikes so deeply into the heart of Patagonia’s wilderness we come to feel at home there. 180° South: Conquerors of the Useless follows Jeff Johnson as he retraces the epic 1968 journey of his heroes Yvon Chouinard and Doug Tompkins to Patagonia. Along the way he gets shipwrecked off Easter Island, surfs the longest wave of his life — and prepares himself for a rare ascent of Cerro Corcovado. Jeff’s life turns when he meets up in a rainy hut with Chouinard and Tompkins who, once driven purely by a love of climbing and surfing, now value above all the experience of raw nature — and have come to Patagonia to spend their fortunes to protect it.

Quotes from the movie:

“The best journeys answer questions that in the beginning you didn’t even think to ask.”

“To love a place, you must know it first.”

“You can’t just keep trying to make a flawed system work.”

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